Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosisis a narrowing of your spinal canal. Spinal stenosisis when the space that houses your spinal cord and nerve roots become narrower – so narrow that your spinal cord and nerve roots get squeezed. Doctors often call this compression.

Compressed spinal cord and nerves doesn’t sound pleasant, and really, spinal stenosis isn’t. It leads to pain in your lower back, legs, neck, arms, or hands. It all depends on where in your back your spinal cord and/or nerves are getting compressed.

Spinal stenosis can happen anywhere in your spine, but it’s most likely to happen in your low back (lumbar spine) or in your neck (cervical spine).

Spinal stenosis is quite common because changes in the spine are a natural part of getting older. Of course, that doesn’t mean that only older people will get spinal stenosis, or that everyone will get spinal stenosis as they age, but it is more common in older people.

Here’s an amazing thing about spinal stenosis: it may not even cause you pain. The channels in your spine may narrow, but they might not press on your spinal cord or nerve roots. People with spinal stenosis have trouble walking, they often have to stop. Other symptoms include leg or arm numbness, or muscle weakness.There could be many other ways that you can feel spinal stenosis.

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Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosisis a narrowing of your spinal canal. Spinal stenosisis when the space that houses your spinal cord and nerve roots become narrower – so narrow that your spinal cord and nerve roots get squeezed. Doctors often call this compression.

Compressed spinal cord and nerves doesn’t sound pleasant, and really, spinal stenosis isn’t. It leads to pain in your lower back, legs, neck, arms, or hands. It all depends on where in your back your spinal cord and/or nerves are getting compressed.

Spinal stenosis can happen anywhere in your spine, but it’s most likely to happen in your low back (lumbar spine) or in your neck (cervical spine).

Spinal stenosis is quite common because changes in the spine are a natural part of getting older. Of course, that doesn’t mean that only older people will get spinal stenosis, or that everyone will get spinal stenosis as they age, but it is more common in older people.

Here’s an amazing thing about spinal stenosis: it may not even cause you pain. The channels in your spine may narrow, but they might not press on your spinal cord or nerve roots. People with spinal stenosis have trouble walking, they often have to stop. Other symptoms include leg or arm numbness, or muscle weakness.There could be many other ways that you can feel spinal stenosis.


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